Search results for: Financial Times Top 300 Advisors

FT 300: Top Registered Investment Advisers

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We are honored to announce that our firm, Ritholtz Wealth Management, has been named to the FT 300 list for 2017. This is a ranking of the top 300 registered investment advisers in the United States according to a comprehensive set of metrics developed by the Financial Times. The list is merit-based, and selects only the best in firms in each state according to that methodology.

For a young firm like ours (we are not quite 4 years old) it is an honor to be included. I am blessed to work with some great partners in Josh, Michael, and Kris; we have a wonderful staff, and a great group of professional advisors, CFAs and CFPs. What we do is the result of a team effort — RWM is a true ensemble practice.

Our goal is to continue delivering the finest services we can to our clients around the nation. We are fortunate to have an engaged, thoughtful and fascinating group of people as clients. We try to live up to the high standards and expectations you hold for us every day.

We are grateful to be included. See you there tonight for a drink . . .

 

 

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Video-O-Rama: Figuring out the lie of the financial land

Video-o-rama: Figuring out the lie of the financial land

In addition to more “Outlook for 2009” videos (dealt with in last week’s Video-o-rama), the past week saw material covering a hodgepodge of topics. Although the topics were varied, good viewing material was produced, with the likes of Marc Faber, Peter Schiff, Martin Feldstein, Barton Biggs, Jeff Saut and Bill Gross in attendance.

A few of the more interesting clips that attracted my attention are shared below, including a few items warning about a bubble in government bonds.

But before we get to the economy and the financial markets, please spend a few minutes viewing a worthwhile three-part production by the Wall Street Journal entitled the “End of Wall Street” – What happened? Why did it happen? And what happens next?

The Wall Street Journal: End of Wall Street
Chapter one: What happened?. In the first of this three-part series, Journal reporters explain how the housing bubble inflated and burst, and why easy money led to the collapse of Wall Street’s biggest financial institutions.
Click here or on the image below for Chapter one.

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Chapter two: Why did it happened? What was going through the minds of CEOs, corporate boards, fund managers and mortgage lenders as they created hard-to-understand derivatives Warren Buffett once called ‘weapons of financial mass destruction’.

Click here for Chaper two.

Chapter three: What happens next? This final chapter of the crisis on Wall Street tells the story of the $700-billion bailout, as seen through a reporter’s eyes, and looks at what’s ahead for the global economy.

Click here for Chapter three.

Source: The Wall Street Journal, January 5, 2009.

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About Barry Ritholtz

 

Barry L. Ritholtz is the co-founder and chief investment officer of Ritholtz Wealth Management LLC. Launched in 2013, RWM is a financial planning and asset management firm, with over $925 million in assets under management. The firm offers a variety of services to the investing public, including Financial Planning and Wealth Management, as well as LiftOff — a low cost online investment site.

In 2017, Ritholtz Wealth Management was named ETF Advisor of the Year. The firm was also named to the Financial Times Top 300 Advisors in the US, and is the 4th fastest-growing RIA in America, according to Financial Advisor magazine.

“To say that Barry Ritholtz ‘pulls no punches’ is like saying that Joe Louis had a nice right cross.”-Jesse’s Café Américain

In addition to running a wealth management and financial planning firm, Ritholtz is a frequent commentator on many financial topics. He was named one of the “15 Most Important Economic Journalists” in the United States, and has been called one of the 25 Most Dangerous People in Financial Media. He writes a daily column for Bloomberg View and previously wrote a monthly column on Personal Finance and Investing for The Washington Post.

Ritholtz is the creator and host of Masters in Business, a popular podcast on Bloomberg Radio. A 90-120 minute deep dive with sone of the most important people in business and finance, the radio/podcast on iTunesSoundcloud, and Bloomberg. It has quickly became one of Bloomberg’s most popular podcasts.

Beyond his commentary and published articles, Mr. Ritholtz also authors The Big Picture — a leading financial weblog, generating several million page views per month. The Big Picture covers Investing & Trading to Macro Economics, and everything else in between. The blog has quickly amassed ~130 million visitors. Media accolades for The Big Picture have poured in: TED named TBP one of top 100 Websites You Should Know and Use; TBP was featured in the 10th annual New York Times magazine “Year in Ideas,”(DIY Economics); Numerous traffic sites rank The Big Picture as one of the most trafficked Markets/Economic’s blogs on the web.

In 2008-09, Ritholtz wrote the book Bailout Nation, published by Wiley in 2009; the updated paperback was released in 2010. Bailout Nation became the best reviewed book on the bailouts, with NYT calling it “Irreverent,” and “an important book about a complicated subject, and yet you could still read it at the beach.WSJ noted “If you want to know how we got into this mess and what might still be coming, this is the book for you.” Bloomberg praised it as “A valuable new contribution to our understanding of how we arrived at this sorry juncture.” Bailout Nation was named “Investment Book of the Year” by Stock Trader’s Almanac, and won aFirst Amendment Award for Outstanding Journalism: Best Book. Numerous media — USA Today, Miami Herald, Marketplace Radio — named it as one of the best finance/business books of 2009.

One of the few strategists who saw the the coming housing implosion and derivative mess far in advance, Ritholtz issued warnings about the market collapse and recession in time for his clients and readers to seek safe harbor. Dow Jones Market Talk noted that “many market observers predict tops and bottoms, but few successfully get their timing right. Jeremy Grantham and Barry Ritholtz sit in the latter category…”  (A summary of major market calls can be found here). His observations are unique in that they are the result of both quantitative data AND behavioral economics, most likely a function of his unusual career path in finance.

Mr. Ritholtz is a frequent commentator on economics and financial markets, and has appeared as a regular guest in most major media outlets.* He has been profiled in the Wall Street Journal’s Quite Contrary column (August 3, 2004; Page C3), and was the subject of several Barron’s interviews (December 8, 2008 and October 26, 2010). Ritholtz was honored to be the dedicatee of Stock Trader’s Almanac‘s 40th Anniversary edition in 2007 and the Yahoo Tech Ticker’s Guest of the Year in 2009.

Mr. Ritholtz performed his graduate studies at Yeshiva University’s Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York, where he focused on Economics, Anti-Trust and Corporate Law. He was a member of the Law Review, and graduated Cum Laude with a 3.56 GPA. His undergraduate work was at Stony Brook University, where on a Regents Scholarship, he focused on Mathematics and Physics, graduating with an Bachelor Arts & Sciences degree in Political Science. He was a member of the Stony Brook Equestrian Team, and competed successfully in the National Championships (1981) of the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association. In addition to writing the National Affairs column for the campus weekly (The Stony Brook Press), he was elected Vice-President of the student body. (Ritholtz best describes it as his Bizarre Academic Career)

After passing the Bar exams in New York and New Jersey, Ritholtz practiced law for a few years, but became disenchanted with his career choice. He shifted his focus to technology and markets, has been an angel investor in early stage technology companies. He is on the Board of Advisors of Riskalyze (creating quantitative measurements of client risk tolerances) and Peer Street (a marketplace that provides unprecedented access to high quality real estate loan investments). He is also an investor in StockTwits, a Twitter based stock community.

When not bemoaning the New York Knicks‘ all-too-frequent offensive lapses, Mr. Ritholtz is a vintage sports car enthusiast. He and his wife Wendy, an artist and teacher, live on the North Shore of Long Island, New York with monsters Teddy and Jackson.

 


  • CNBC, Bloomberg, Fox, CNN, ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS, MSNBC, and C/SPAN, including shows, such as Nightline,ABC World News Tonight, NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams, Fast Money, Kudlow & Co, and Power Lunch, and has guest-hosted Squawk Box on numerous occasions. He appears regularly on radio for Bloomberg, NPR, CBS, and other broadcasters. His market perspectives are quoted regularly in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Barron’s, GQ, Forbes, Fortune, Smart Money, Kiplingers, and other print media.

10 Monday AM Reads

My morning train plane reads:

• You Can Time The Market, Just Not All The Time (Wall Street Journal)
• The Housing Bubble Burst All Over Reality TV (New York Times)
• Meet the Shalennials: CEOs Under 40 Making Millions in Texas Oil (Bloomberg)
• An Equator Full of Hurricanes Is a Preview of End Times (Wired)
• How much would the iPhone cost if it were made in America? (Vox)

Be sure to check out our Masters in Business interview this weekend with David Nadig, managing director of ETF.com. Previously, he was director of ETFs at FactSet Research Systems. Nadig helped design some of the first ETFs at BGI, and as co-founder of Cerulli Associates, he conducted some of the earliest research on fee-only financial advisors and the rise of indexing.

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10 Sunday Reads

My easy like Sunday morning reads:

• The NFL’s Very Profitable Existential Crisis (Bloomberg)
• 3 Investments That May Have Hit Their Peak (New York Times)
• Investors Should Assume That They Are No Better Than Average (Behavioural Investment)
• Why we buy the things we buy (Vox)
• Open Letter to Times Op-ed Writer: Go Public Now, Before They Bust You (Daily Beast) see also Nobody’s Heroes: Bob Woodward’s New Book Presents Trump Staffers as Our Last Line of Defense. We’re Doomed. (Slate)
• A World With Fewer Babies Spells Economic Trouble (Bloomberg Businessweek)
• How to Win in Venture Capital: Focus on the Fat Tails (Noteworthy) see also Atoms and Bits (AVC)
• Amid nationwide strike, media access to prisons is limited (Columbia Journalism Review)
• Trump’s long history of lying about 9/11 and exploiting it for personal gain (Washington Post)
• The Dynasty That Never Was: Inside the Unraveling of the Seattle Seahawks (Sports Illustrated)

Be sure to check out our Masters in Business interview this weekend with David Nadig, managing director of ETF.com. Previously, he was director of ETFs at FactSet Research Systems. Nadig helped design some of the first ETFs at BGI, and as co-founder of Cerulli Associates, he conducted some of the earliest research on fee-only financial advisors and the rise of indexing.

 

 

Nuclear security is improving almost everywhere

Source: Economist

 

 

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10 Weekend Reads

The weekend is here! Pour yourself a mug of French Roast coffee, grab a seat by the window, and get ready for our longer form weekend reads:

• The real Goldfinger: the London banker who broke the world (The Guardian)
• A Warning From Europe: The Worst Is Yet to Come (The Atlantic)
• Inside the World of Eddy Cue, Apple’s Services Chief (The Information)
• Seattle’s last 3 video rental stores strive to remain part of the neighborhood (Seattle Times)
• Startups Flock to Turn Young Blood Into an Elixir of Youth (Wired)
• The mystery of Tucker Carlson (Columbia Journalism Review)
• ‘Bless Nixon for Those Tapes’: An Interview with John Dean (New York Review of Books)
• What Is Threatening Science? (Project Syndicatesee also Are the foot soldiers behind psychology’s replication crisis saving science — or destroying it? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
• On going on and on and on: The fantasy of living forever is just a fig leaf for the fear of death – and comes at great personal cost (Aeon)
• The Untold Stories of Paul McCartney (GQ)

Be sure to check out our Masters in Business interview this weekend with David Nadig, managing director of ETF.com. Previously, he was director of ETFs at FactSet Research Systems. Nadig helped design some of the first ETFs at BGI, and as co-founder of Cerulli Associates, he conducted some of the earliest research on fee-only financial advisors and the rise of indexing.

 

Most Brexit bills are caught up in a slow legislative grind

Source: Economist

 

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10 Weekend Reads

The weekend is here! Pour yourself a mug of Danish Blend coffee, grab a seat in the beach house, and get ready for our longer form weekend reads:

• New Details About Wilbur Ross’ Business Point To Pattern Of Grifting (Forbes)
• Ten Years After the Crash, We Are Still Living in the World It Brutally Remade. (New York Magazine)
• What Trauma Docs Know (Chicago Magazine)
(Medium)
• James O’Shaughnessy Interview: How he rewrote the rules on stock market investing (Stockopedia)
• Inside the Very Big, Very Controversial Business of Dog Cloning (Vanity Fair)
• Visions of Bitcoin: How major Bitcoin narratives changed over time
• The Cognitive Biases Tricking Your Brain (The Atlanticsee also Denialism: what drives people to reject the truth (The Guardian)
• How Broad, and How Happy, Is the Trump Coalition? (The Upshot)
• The Spy Who Drove Me (GQ)
• This NASA spacecraft is about to probe one of Earth’s scariest threats — the sun (Washington Post)

Be sure to check out our Masters in Business interview this weekend with Lee Cooperman, CEO/Chairman of Omega Advisors, a New York-based hedge fund managing $3.5 billion dollars, which is being converted into a family office. Cooperman, 75, is an active philanthropist, a member of The Giving Pledge, and has committed to giving his wealth away in his lifetime.

 

World Reaches 1,000GW of Wind and Solar, Keeps Going

Source: BloombergNEF

 

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10 Monday AM Reads

My back to work morning train reads:

• Foreign investment in the United States plunged 32% in 2017 (CNN Money)
• Unlike most millennials, Norway’s are rich (BBC)
• The fallacy that became itself a fallacy (Medium)
• How the Kremlin crafted a popular brand: Putin (Washington Post) see also China and the world: how Beijing spreads the message (Financial Times)
• Tired of Being Crammed Into an Airline Seat? You Have Options (New York Times)

Be sure to check out our Masters in Business interview this weekend with Dave Butler, Co-Chief Executive Officer and Head of Global Financial Advisor Services at Dimensional Fund Advisors, which manages $600 billion dollars.

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10 Weekend Reads

The weekend is here! Pour yourself a mug of French Mocha coffee, grab a seat on the beach, and get ready for our longer form weekend reads:

• The Entire History of Steel: From hunks of iron streaking through the sky, to the construction of skyscrapers and megastructures, this is the history of the world’s greatest alloy. (Popular Mechanics)
• People Aren’t Dumb. The World Is Hard. (Freakonomics)
• The endless reign of Rupert Murdoch (The Monthly)
• Hell for Elon Musk Is a Midsize Sedan (Bloomberg Businessweek)
• Don’t imagine you’re smarter (London Review of Books)
• The Flawed Legend of Preet Bharara: Slip the martyrdom — he failed to prosecute the Wall Streeters who brought us the financial crisis (The Nation)
• How the BBC Lost the Plot on Brexit (New York Review of Books)
• So Many Seats, So Many Tax Breaks (New York Times)
• Inside the radical, uncomfortable movement to reform white supremacists (Mother Jones)
• How Smart Speakers Are Changing the Way We Listen to Music (Pitchfork)

Be sure to check out our Masters in Business interview this weekend with Dave Butler, Co-Chief Executive Officer and Head of Global Financial Advisor Services at Dimensional Fund Advisors, which manages $600 billion dollars.

 

Mortgage rates in the 21st century

Source: @lenkiefer

 

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10 Friday AM Reads

My Friday the 13th, morning train reads:

• The Scooter Wars will be a bloodbath — and Uber will win (Recodesee also The Age of Floating Transport: Many years ago, humans invented the wheel. Then one day they invented the app. Now you need apps to use wheels (Medium)
• Hedge Funds Should Be Thriving Right Now. They Aren’t. (New York Times)
• On coincidence (Aeon)
• From Kellyanne Conway to Stephen Miller, Trump’s advisers face taunts from hecklers around D.C. (Washington Post)
• How to Host a Wine-Soaked BBQ (Vivino)

Be sure to check out our Masters in Business interview this weekend with Dave Butler, Co-Chief Executive Officer and Head of Global Financial Advisor Services at Dimensional Fund Advisors, which manages $600 billion dollars.

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