S&P500 Relative Sector Performance Year-to-Date

Via Mike Panzner, comes this list of sector runs for this year:

Sectors2006

Sector Performance Table

 

Sector YTD Change
Telecom Services +28.50
Energy +23.98
Materials +17.09
Consumer Discretion +16.44 
Utilities  +16.11
Financials  +13.59
S&P 500 +12.94
Consumer Staples +11.32 
  Industrials  +10.53
Information Technology +8.58
Health Care +4.66

 

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What's been said:

Discussions found on the web:
  1. DavidB commented on Dec 11

    All my stuff is green today. That includes golds. Has the Santa rally begun in earnest?

  2. John commented on Dec 11

    To Hell with Santa. It’s time for the Grinch to make an appearance and blow Santa and this Managed Market Rally out of the Sky.

  3. my1ambition commented on Dec 11

    Barry, watching gold and silver recently I noticed some serious run-ups. Could it be all those short sellers buying-to-cover after seeing silver test 14 highs or just the same-old volatile silver market?

  4. David commented on Dec 11

    The telecom rally has surprised me all year.

  5. rebound commented on Dec 12

    Cool. What will a future sector rotation bring? What can I buy now that is cheap? If the “laggards” Health Care and Consumer Staples popped 4.66% and 11.32%(!!!) respectively, then the tide has kindly lifted all boats.

    Energy at +23.98 makes sense looking in the rear view mirror … though I won’t be trying to ride this higher or lower.

    But Telecom at +28.50??? Why? I don’t understand. We have cheaper bandwidth through competition, cheaper phones through competition. Lower and lower barriers to entry. It seems to me that beaming ones and zeros around the planet upon rapidly depreciating assets is not a great game to be in. When this sector goes “pop” someone always seems to score the fiber and other goodies at bottom dollar. Were we not here in the not so distant past?

    With the Arecibo radio telescope pointed at the heavens we can still hear the reverberations from the Big Bang.

    Maybe we should whip out stethoscopes and listen to our 401K statements circa 2000.

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